Shake and Bake Pork Chops

Ingredients

  • 3 cups bread crumbs (not panko)
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons table salt (not kosher)
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 teaspoon celery salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder
  • 6 bone in 1/2″ thick pork chops
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The FDA Says It’s Now Safe To Eat Romaine From Certain States

The ban on all romaine lettuce is officially over. Last week, the CDC recommended staying away from romaine altogether while an on-going investigation — into an E. coli outbreak that impacted 43 people in 12 states — determined the source of the bacteria. According to the FDA, it has been determined that the E. coli can be traced back to California. “Romaine lettuce that was harvested outside of the Central Coast growing regions of northern and central California does not appear to be related to the current outbreak. Hydroponically- and greenhouse-grown romaine also does not appear to be related to the current outbreak. There is no recommendation for consumers or retailers to avoid using romaine harvested from these sources,” explained the FDA in a statement. See here for more information on how to tell if romaine is safe to eat.

Put down that salad fork, everyone. The Centers for Disease Control have just released a pretty drastic warning, advising people in the U.S. and Canada not to eat any romaine lettuce, no matter where it’s from. This is due to an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, which has so far sickened 32 people in 11 states, with 13 landing in the hospital. In Canada, another 18 people in two provinces were also infected.

The reported illnesses all happened in October, but because the CDC has not identified a source for the lettuce, it says that all romaine everywhere is suspect. This is the same kind of bacteria — but not the same outbreak — that caused the great Yuma, Arizona, romaine scare of earlier this spring.

“Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick,” says the alert. “This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad.”

If you have had any romaine — or any salad mix that may have contained romaine — in your refrigerator, you should also take steps to thoroughly clean and sanitize the drawer or shelves where it was stored.

Symptoms of E. coli infection can include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting and fever. According to the CDC, most people get better within five to seven days, but if you have diarrhea for more than three days or accompanied by high fever, blood in the stool, or the kind of persistent vomiting that won’t even let you keep liquids down, see a doctor. There is a chance you could develop a kidney-damaging condition known as hemolytic uremic syndrome, so this is nothing to take lightly.

Lemon Blueberry Bread

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup butter, melted
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup 2% milk
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped nuts
  • 2 tablespoons grated lemon zest
GLAZE:
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup sugar

Italian Crudités

Ingredients

  • 8 young or Thumbelina carrots, scrubbed, halved
  • 8 red and/or breakfast radishes, trimmed, thinly sliced
  • 8 thin asparagus spears, trimmed
  • 1 celery heart, cut lengthwise into 8 wedges
  • ¼ head of cauliflower, Romanesco, and/or broccoli, cut into small florets
  • 2 baby fennel bulbs, halved lengthwise, cut into ¼-inch-thick strips
  • 2 endives, leaves separated
  • 2 heads of Little Gem lettuces, leaves separated
  • 4 spring onions, trimmed, halved lengthwise
  • ½ bunch watercress, tough stems removed
  • 2 ounces haricots verts, trimmed
  • 1 lemon, cut into quarters
  • Flaky sea salt
  • 1 cup olive oil

Rigatoni Chard Toss

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces uncooked rigatoni or large tube pasta
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, coarsely chopped
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 medium tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 can (15 ounces) cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1/8 teaspoon fennel seed, crushed
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh basil
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Spicy Tofu Crumbles

Ingredients

  • 1 pound extra-firm tofu, sliced ¾ inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 Fresno chile, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons mirin
  • 2 tablespoons Sriracha or gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)
  • 2 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger

The Holiday Foods Nutritionists Avoid

Healthier Holidays

During the holidays, it’s easier than ever for eating to become overindulgence. Whether it’s Halloween or Hanukah, there are just so many special treats that you can convince yourself only come around once a year. But there are always healthier options, and even shaving back on a handful of calories during each holiday can make a big difference. To see what the experts do during the holidays, check out what 10 registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) skip during the holidays, and the healthier food they opt for instead.