‘Game Of Thrones’ Largest Man Eats Up to 10,000 Calories Per Day

Fans of the hit HBO series Game of Thrones will no doubt be familiar with Hafþór Júlíus Björnsson, the 400-pound Icelandic actor and bodybuilder who plays Ser Gregor Clegane, A.K.A. “The Mountain.”

What those fans might not have known (though they might well have suspected) is that Björnsson also happens to be the World’s Strongest Man—a feat he has attained by sticking to a monstrous diet.

Björnsson, who stands at six-feet-nine, recently explained to Business Insider that he burns through six meals per day in order to sustain his bulk and exercise regimen—an immense amount of food that can add up to about 10,000 calories each day.

To give him those calories, he mainly eats lean proteins and simple carbohydrates, including steak, rice, carrots, peppers and sometimes chicken.

If you’re feeling jealous about being able to eat that much all the time, maybe don’t be.

“I think sometimes, ‘Is this worth it?’” he told Business Insider. “I’m always eating, and I’m never hungry. I’m always eating and working out.”

The FDA Says It’s Now Safe To Eat Romaine From Certain States

The ban on all romaine lettuce is officially over. Last week, the CDC recommended staying away from romaine altogether while an on-going investigation — into an E. coli outbreak that impacted 43 people in 12 states — determined the source of the bacteria. According to the FDA, it has been determined that the E. coli can be traced back to California. “Romaine lettuce that was harvested outside of the Central Coast growing regions of northern and central California does not appear to be related to the current outbreak. Hydroponically- and greenhouse-grown romaine also does not appear to be related to the current outbreak. There is no recommendation for consumers or retailers to avoid using romaine harvested from these sources,” explained the FDA in a statement. See here for more information on how to tell if romaine is safe to eat.

Put down that salad fork, everyone. The Centers for Disease Control have just released a pretty drastic warning, advising people in the U.S. and Canada not to eat any romaine lettuce, no matter where it’s from. This is due to an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, which has so far sickened 32 people in 11 states, with 13 landing in the hospital. In Canada, another 18 people in two provinces were also infected.

The reported illnesses all happened in October, but because the CDC has not identified a source for the lettuce, it says that all romaine everywhere is suspect. This is the same kind of bacteria — but not the same outbreak — that caused the great Yuma, Arizona, romaine scare of earlier this spring.

“Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick,” says the alert. “This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad.”

If you have had any romaine — or any salad mix that may have contained romaine — in your refrigerator, you should also take steps to thoroughly clean and sanitize the drawer or shelves where it was stored.

Symptoms of E. coli infection can include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting and fever. According to the CDC, most people get better within five to seven days, but if you have diarrhea for more than three days or accompanied by high fever, blood in the stool, or the kind of persistent vomiting that won’t even let you keep liquids down, see a doctor. There is a chance you could develop a kidney-damaging condition known as hemolytic uremic syndrome, so this is nothing to take lightly.

Americans Are Cooking More Meals at Home, Eating Out Less

Are you cooking at home more than you used to and eating out at fast-food restaurants less? If so, you are right on trend.

Today, 82 percent of the meals Americans eat are prepared at home, a much higher percentage than a decade ago, according to research from NPD Group Inc. cited by Bloomberg.

At the same time, restaurant dining has declined. The average American ate out about 185 times last year, whereas in 2000 they ate out about 216 times a year, NPD reported. In fact, in 2018, the total number of restaurant visits per person hit its lowest point in 28 years, according to Bloomberg.

So what’s driving the eat-at-home trend? A bunch of things, probably. But a lot of it may be that the money-versus-convenience ratio is changing.

Cooking meals at home is getting more convenient. We stay in and watch Netflix and so eat at home, rather than, say, going out to the movies and grabbing dinner out. Pre-made meals and online grocery delivery are on the rise, Bloomberg notes, making eating at home a cinch.

Meanwhile, eating out has gotten more expensive, as restaurants have boosted prices to keep up with rising labor and rent costs. Add to that the increasing pressure of student debt, the high cost of childcare and a growing interest in eating healthy meals, and home cooking — often cheaper and healthier — starts to look a lot more appealing than forking over for a high-cal fast-food meal.

To mitigate the effects of the changing consumer habits on their bottom lines, some fast-food chains — like Chick-fil-A — are testing meal kits you can buy in the drive-thru lane and cook at home, Bloomberg reports.